Monday, January 27, 2014

Make Editing Fun Seminar

Another great NaNoWriMo find!

I know it is short notice but I thought this webinar sounded great on it's own but once you've researched the presenters you will be scrambling to sign up!


MAKE EDITING FUN: HOW TO ENJOY REVISION $60

The first 200 writers who sign up by January 28 will receive invitations via email to participate in this webinar, which will take place on Wednesday, January 29, from 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM Pacific. If you can’t join the webinar live, we'll happily send you a link to the recording afterward.
About the Webinar
One of the hardest things for NaNo writers is to take their beautiful but unshaped novel drafts and turn them into glorious works of art that agents, publishers, and readers will fall in love with. But what may seem a confusing and slightly terrifying task can actually be a systematic and easily understood process.
And yes, it can even be fun!
Join the Book Doctors, Arielle Eckstut and David Henry Sterry, who have helped dozens of talented amateurs become professionally published authors. Between them, they have over 30 years of experience in the publishing business, and have authored, agented and/or midwived hundreds of books, including The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published: How to Write It, Sell It, and Market It… Successfully.
The Book Doctors will cover:
· Starting your novel with a bang
· Shaping character arcs
· Pacing
· Building suspense
· Opening and closing chapters
· Avoiding repetition
· Trimming fat
· Making the most of your title
· Knowing when to show and when to tell
· Avoiding clich├ęs
· Keeping dialogue real
· Reading aloud
· Killing your darlings
· Finding beta readers
· Achieving objectivity
· Using your pitch to perfect your plot
Professional Editing Demonstration
The Book Doctors will also randomly select a number of first paragraphs from attendees’ manuscripts during the webinar to demonstrate what a professional edit would look like.
Send your first paragraph in the body of the email to nanowrimo[at]thebookdoctors[dot]com when you sign up.
Register now!
https://store.nanowrimo.org/donations/make-editing-fun-how-enjoy-revision

Saturday, January 25, 2014



I have not been very good at keeping this blog up because I thought it must have a format.  Everyone I know who has a blog talks about their set up of Mondays I do this, Wednesdays this and Fridays is this.  I did not grow up in a home where every Tuesday we ate pasta primavera and every Friday was pizza and I would find that kind of routine very boring.

How do I know that I am going to want pizza on Friday?  I felt the same way about the blog and the self-imposed format I was trying to force onto it was keeping me away.  I tend to avoid that which I don't want to do, come on, don't we all?  I do excel at it though.

I learned a great term at NaNoWriMo and that is pantster.  A person is either a planner or a pantster, as in fly by the seat of your pants.  That term fits me to a T.  I am a pantster.

If I want to actually keep this blog up and have it be enjoyable for me as well as you I have to go with my personal strength and that is flying by the seat of my pants.

So my mission for this blog is to enjoy it.  I want to put out information that I enjoy and meet great people in the blogging community and this is my creative outlet to do that.

Please take the time to reach out, comment on what you like and don't.  I love feed back and that is the only way for me to make this blog more fun for all of us, not just me throwing my ideas into a void.

I hope everyone is enjoying the weekend and staying warm if you are in someplace cold.

Thanks for visiting.

Wednesday, January 22, 2014



Well I did it.  I participated in NaNoWriMo and won.  Many of my friends did not get the concept of winning being just the great sense of accomplishment, which really was incredible.

I took December off due to work and family demands and now I need to get back into the swing of things.

To rev myself up I searched the web for inspiration and found a great article about publishing in a literary journal.

http://www.thereviewreview.net/publishing-tips/what-editors-want-must-read-writers-submitti

I hope you enjoy the article and find it helpful.

I also learned a term from this article I had not previously known which was:
Galley Proof or Galleys definition from Wikipedia:
In printing and publishing, proofs are the preliminary versions of publications meant for review by authors, editors, and proofreaders, often with extra-wide margins. Galley proofs may be uncut and unbound, or in some cases electronically published. They are created for proofreading and copyediting purposes, but may be used for promotional and review purposes also.[1][2][3]
Galley proofs are so named because in the days of hand-set letterpress printing, the printer would set the page into galleys, the metal trays into which type was laid and tightened into place. These would be used to print a limited number of copies for proofreading. The printer would then receive the edits, re-arrange the type, and print the final copy.
Some publishers use paper galley proofs as advance copies, providing them to reviewers, magazines, and libraries in advance of final publication. These print-on-demand (POD) pre-publication publicity proofs are normally bound, but may be lacking illustrations (or have them in black and white only). Proofs in electronic form are rarely offered for advance reading.
Proofs issued in the proofreading and copy-editing review phase are called galleys or galley proofs; proofs created in a near-final version for editing and checking purposes are called page proofs. In the page-proof stage, mistakes are supposed to have been corrected; to correct a mistake at this stage is expensive, and authors are discouraged from making many changes to page proofs. Page layouts are examined closely in the page proof stage. Page proofs also have the final pagination, which facilitates compiling the index.

These days, as paper and digital forms share the final product that readers actually use, the term 'uncorrected proof' is more common as a term than galley proof, which refers exclusively to a paper proof version. Uncorrected proof describes the penultimate proof version (on paper or in digital form) yet to receive final author and publisher approval, the term appearing on the covers of advance reading copies (ARCs).

If you participated in NaNoWriMo 2013 congratulations!  That is a great step in reaching your goals.  Don't forget to keep the momentum going.  The site and community of writers is still there for you.

KAT